Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees
Vocaboly.com Forum Index Vocaboly.com
Vocabulary builder software for SAT, TOEFL, GRE, GMAT and more
 
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 
This forum is read-only. If you want to ask English questions, please visit Learn English Forum.
Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Vocaboly.com Forum Index -> soc.college.admissions
Author Message
Marcelo Bruno
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 10, 2004 8:03 am    Post subject: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

I'm trying to compile a list of European academic degrees with their
(approximate) American equivalents. So far, here is what I've been
able to come up with:


U.S. England France Germany


N/A Bachelor's Licence Vordiplom

B.S/B.A. B. w/Honours Maîtrise Magister or Diplom
or Diplôme
(grandes écoles)

M.S/M.A. M.Phil D.E.A Magister or Diplom
(with thesis)

J.D. ? ? ?

M.D. ? ? ?


Ph.D. Ph.D. Docteur Doktor
(Dr-Ing,Dr.rer.nat,etc)



Note that, since degrees from different countries are not directly
comparable, there isn't an exact one-to-one correspondence in the
table above. For example,
from a German perspective, a 5-year Diplom in, let's say, engineering,
may be viewed as equivalent to an American M.S. in the sense that it
allows direct entry into a doctoral program. On the other hand though,
a German Diploma is also equivalent to an American B.S. since it
serves as a first professional degree in engineering and sciences and
may be a terminal degree for a student who chooses to go straight into
industry right after graduation. Likewise, the proper interpretaion of
French degrees is tricky. Several Frenchmen may claim that a D.E.A. is
higher as a degree than an American M.S or a German Diplom, although
all three enable entry into a doctorate.

I would appreciate your comments. Thanks.
Back to top
David Off
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 10, 2004 3:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

bruno@ece.cmu.edu (Marcelo Bruno) wrote in message news:<5f709a92.0407091803.46f3dfde@posting.google.com>...
Quote:
everal Frenchmen may claim that a D.E.A. is
higher as a degree than an American M.S or a German Diplom, although
all three enable entry into a doctorate.

I would appreciate your comments. Thanks.

Touchy subject. You'll find the French and Germans will claim their
first degrees are worth more than the anglo-saxon equivalents because
they take more years of study. There is also a big difference in
attitudes from employers. In France your Bac+3,4,5 will follow you
though life. People will still be more interested in your degree at 45
than in your 20 years of work experience.

The situation in europe is becoming a bit clearer as the LMD
(License/Maitrise/Doctorat) system replaces the local equivalents.
Basically the anglo-saxon system is being imposed. This, of course,
has had both lecturers and students out on the streets in France as
they like their confusing Dugs and Deas.

As a manager hiring people in a technical environemnt I treat a French
'maitrise' as the same as a British B.Sc. based on what graduates are
capable of. The French seem to be more rigourous in their application
of learning than anglo-saxons but less capable of working well in
teams and less able to think outside the box. Certainly there is a lot
of rote learning in the French system.

German graduates are often just too old to hire, they don't seem to
finish their university until their late 20s. I'm told this is a
mixture of laziness and an underfunded and overcrowded education
system.

Please note that these are generalisations and someone looking for
researchers might well have different criteria.

Grade inflation is a problem that seemingly affects the whole of
Europe these days. In France hardly anyone fails their BAC anymore.
Back to top
thomsen
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 10, 2004 4:11 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

Marcelo Bruno wrote:

Quote:
I'm trying to compile a list of European academic degrees with their
(approximate) American equivalents. So far, here is what I've been
able to come up with:


U.S. England France Germany


N/A Bachelor's Licence Vordiplom

B.S/B.A. B. w/Honours Maîtrise Magister or Diplom
or Diplôme
(grandes écoles)

M.S/M.A. M.Phil D.E.A Magister or Diplom
(with thesis)

J.D. ? ? ?

M.D. ? ? ?


Ph.D. Ph.D. Docteur Doktor
(Dr-Ing,Dr.rer.nat,etc)



Note that, since degrees from different countries are not directly
comparable, there isn't an exact one-to-one correspondence in the
table above. For example,
from a German perspective, a 5-year Diplom in, let's say, engineering,
may be viewed as equivalent to an American M.S. in the sense that it
allows direct entry into a doctoral program. On the other hand though,
a German Diploma is also equivalent to an American B.S. since it
serves as a first professional degree in engineering and sciences and
may be a terminal degree for a student who chooses to go straight into
industry right after graduation.

Not really: it is a bit more tricky. The difference is that in Germany,
there are two sorts of engineer's Diplomas: The Fachhochschul-Diplom
(FH), which is sufficient for going "straight into industry right after
graduation", with a somewhat light-weight diploma thesis, and the
University Diploma, which takes more time, gives more scientific
background (hopefully) and comprises a heavy-weight diploma thesis.
AFAIK, there's no comparable thing going with a B.S.

In a German enterprise, a FH-Diploma is very much appreciated as far
as practice and efficiency are concerned, but one would probably expect
an engineer from a polytechnical university after some training on the
job to be more capable to work independently on larger projects, and
of course to do research work.

In a first and rough approximation, one might try to establish an
equivalence between FH-diploma and BS on the one hand, and Univerisity
diploma and MS on the other hand, but this would probably underestimate
the qualification of a FH-engineer. This also somewhat explains the
longer time spent on a university degree than on a Fachhochschul-Diplom".

Quote:
Likewise, the proper interpretaion of
French degrees is tricky. Several Frenchmen may claim that a D.E.A. is
higher as a degree than an American M.S or a German Diplom, although
all three enable entry into a doctorate.

Well, in Germany it seems to be the other way round. But then, there
is a tendency in Germany to appreciate a German doctorate more than
a French doctorat d'universite. That of couse, is a matter of
discussion. Certainly, a German university diploma comprises more than
a French maitrise, whereas a French Licence is probably more than a
German Vordiplom, which is more like a French DEUG or DUES (that's how
it once was called - I don't know what it is today: it closes the
"premier cycle" after two years of university studies).

Quote:
I would appreciate your comments. Thanks.

regards,

A.
Back to top
thomsen
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 10, 2004 4:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

David Off wrote:

Quote:
Touchy subject. You'll find the French and Germans will claim their
first degrees are worth more than the anglo-saxon equivalents because
they take more years of study. There is also a big difference in
attitudes from employers. In France your Bac+3,4,5 will follow you
though life. People will still be more interested in your degree at 45
than in your 20 years of work experience.

The situation in europe is becoming a bit clearer as the LMD
(License/Maitrise/Doctorat) system replaces the local equivalents.
Basically the anglo-saxon system is being imposed. This, of course,
has had both lecturers and students out on the streets in France as
they like their confusing Dugs and Deas.

As a manager hiring people in a technical environemnt I treat a French
'maitrise' as the same as a British B.Sc. based on what graduates are
capable of. The French seem to be more rigourous in their application
of learning than anglo-saxons but less capable of working well in
teams and less able to think outside the box. Certainly there is a lot
of rote learning in the French system.

German graduates are often just too old to hire, they don't seem to
finish their university until their late 20s. I'm told this is a
mixture of laziness and an underfunded and overcrowded education
system.

The problem is, apart from different traditions and more time spent
on secondary education, that a German Diploma comprises quite a
comprehensive thesis, on which the average student more often than not
spends a full year, even after having finished all other examens.
It is wrong to blame this on the supposed "laziness" of the students -
often it is due to the dircting professor's exigencies.
The "lazyness" of students may exist nevertheless, and problems of
underfunding and overcrowding exist as well, but probably are not worse
than in France. The difference between Germany and France is that French
students enter university about two years earlier, and their schedule
is tightly organized, whereas the German university system comprises a
certain anarchical component, called "academic freedom" dear to both
professors and students.

Quote:
Please note that these are generalisations and someone looking for
researchers might well have different criteria.

Grade inflation is a problem that seemingly affects the whole of
Europe these days. In France hardly anyone fails their BAC anymore.

Anybody failing his high school education in the US?

regards,
A.
Back to top
Marcelo Bruno
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2004 9:03 am    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

thomsen <a.thomsen@gmx.de> wrote in message news:<2l9ueoF9v2alU1@uni-berlin.de>...
Quote:
David Off wrote:

German graduates are often just too old to hire, they don't seem to
finish their university until their late 20s. I'm told this is a
mixture of laziness and an underfunded and overcrowded education
system.

overcrowding exist as well, but probably are not worse
than in France. The difference between Germany and France is that French
students enter university about two years earlier, and their schedule
is tightly organized, whereas the German university system comprises a
certain anarchical component, called "academic freedom" dear to both
professors and students.


That so-called "anarchical component" is precisely what US students
find hard to understand! As you may know, the American university
system is based on a continuous assessment of student performance.
Students must enroll every semester in a minimum set of required
and/or elective classes and, for each class they take, they are given
a grade based not only on final exams, but also on mid-term tests,
(compulsory) class attendance, weekly homework and class projects.
That model applies not only to undergrads, but even to Ph.D. students
in the early stages (first year) of their program !

I can understand that, from a German perspective, the American model
as described above may sound somewhat paternalistic, treating
university students more like schoolchildren than young adults.
However, I must also admit the American concept of continuously
"supervised learning" does have a few advantages (in efficiency terms)
when compared to a system like in Germany where performance assessment
occurs only through graduation theses and a relatively small set of
comprehensive final exams at the end of every study cycle/module.

Talking to former classmates of mine who got their diplomas from
German universities and later pursued their Ph.D. degrees in the US,
my impression was that they all mentioned a "crisis of the German
university system" and believed the US model compared favorably to the
one they had left behind in Europe. Obviously though, my classmates
constituted a biased sample (if they believed in the superiority of
the German system, they probably would not have moved to the US in the
first place!). In the end, I think it is actually impossible to tell
which system is better or worse; they're just different! One thing is
certain though: when you browse the scientific journals or attend the
technical conferences, you will notice that American universities may
be dominant in scholarly output as a result of the sheer size of the
country and its student/faculty population, but there is also a
significant amount of high quality science coming not only from
Germany, but also France, the UK, and even smaller countries like the
Netherlands or Sweden.
Back to top
Paul Schmitz-Josten
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2004 5:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

David Off in <de30ee00.0407100149.49e263bb@posting.google.com>:

Quote:
German graduates are often just too old to hire, they don't seem to
finish their university until their late 20s.

So, two years make the difference even between 25 and 27?

Quote:
I'm told this is a
mixture of laziness and an underfunded and overcrowded education
system.

Nope, it is the system:

Start school at 6,
years to Abitur: 13,
years in the army: 1 (only guys),
years in university: 5

That makes the young people at least 25 (women 24).

Imagine delays:
- Start school at 7 years or at almost 7 (when born late in the year)
- study longer due to working to earn your living

then they'll be 27 or 28 without a problem.

Why are they too old to hire?

Ciao,

Paul
Back to top
inge
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2004 7:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

thomsen wrote:
Quote:


The problem is, apart from different traditions and more time spent
on secondary education, that a German Diploma comprises quite a
comprehensive thesis, on which the average student more often than not
spends a full year, even after having finished all other examens.
It is wrong to blame this on the supposed "laziness" of the students -
often it is due to the dircting professor's exigencies.

Can also happen that you hand in your thesis and the professor doesn't
find the time to read it for one year. So you put in two more semesters
of university, dodging angry letters from the bureaucracy who insists
that you are over time and should leave, and working odd jobs until you
finally get your degree.

Quote:

The "lazyness" of students may exist nevertheless, and problems of
underfunding and overcrowding exist as well, but probably are not worse
than in France. The difference between Germany and France is that French
students enter university about two years earlier, and their schedule
is tightly organized, whereas the German university system comprises a
certain anarchical component, called "academic freedom" dear to both
professors and students.

Of course, if you managed to survive said anarchy or even thrive in it,
chaos has lost its ability to scare you ;-)

inge

--
It is easier to stay out than get out.
- Mark Twain
===
<http://home.foni.net/~lyorn> -- Stories, RPG & stuff.
===
To send me priority mail, replace 'wildwusel' with 'lyorn'.
Back to top
inge
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2004 7:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

Paul Schmitz-Josten wrote:
Quote:

David Off in <de30ee00.0407100149.49e263bb@posting.google.com>:

German graduates are often just too old to hire, they don't seem to
finish their university until their late 20s.

So, two years make the difference even between 25 and 27?

I'm told this is a
mixture of laziness and an underfunded and overcrowded education
system.

Nope, it is the system:

Start school at 6,
years to Abitur: 13,
years in the army: 1 (only guys),
years in university: 5

That makes the young people at least 25 (women 24).

Imagine delays:
- Start school at 7 years or at almost 7 (when born late in the year)
- study longer due to working to earn your living

Another one. A little extreme, but not unrealisitc IME:

- start school at seven because school is considered stealing your
childhood, so better to start late.

- at 13 or 14 you get fed up with life, school and everything, which
ends in you having to repeat a year. (Variant: Your parents are moving
and you have difficulty adapting.)

- finish school aged 20

- try to get into vocational training, because, honestly, you need the
money. Lose one year.

- do a social year in the hope of getting accepted into vocational
training afterwards, decide what you're going to do if you're not, and
make some money. Finally start writing your letters to get accepted at a
university.

- get accepted at a university age 22.

- at 24 you need one more course to take your halfway examination. You
should have taken the course a year ago, but you lost the lottery and
didn't get a place. They told you you are sure to get a place next year
(now). However, due to an organizational mishap, you still do not get
the place. You raise a stink and get people to apologize, however, they
can't kick someone off the course now, can they? You just have to wait
another year.

- at 25 you take your halfway examinations. You pass all at first try.

- your parents have lost patience and money's running out big time. You
take a job for 20 hours a week. If you copy all the books you need you
might just manage financially, however, you are not 18 anymore and need
your sleep occasionally. You hope you can still finish in 4 more years.

- at 27 you get sick for a month. Lose a months study and a month's pay.
Have to work 40 hours to pay the debt.

- at 28 you're back on track. Two more years.

- at 30 you take your examinations and pass all at first try. You start
working on your thesis

- half a year later you hand in your thesis. Again, half a year later
the professor deigns to read it. Now the bureaucracy has to find a date
to hand you your graduation paper. That takes another month or two.

- at late 31 you finally graduate.

Of course, one could argue that you have entered the work force at 25...

inge

--
It is easier to stay out than get out.
- Mark Twain
===
<http://home.foni.net/~lyorn> -- Stories, RPG & stuff.
===
To send me priority mail, replace 'wildwusel' with 'lyorn'.
Back to top
Paul Schmitz-Josten
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2004 9:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

inge in <40F13E55.5DC937AF@gmx.de>:

Quote:
Another one. A little extreme, but not unrealisitc IME:
snip
- at late 31 you finally graduate.

ACK, but I refused to take such conditions into account:
David shure won't accept those graduates with some realistic deviations in
their vita.

Quote:
Of course, one could argue that you have entered the work force at 25...

<bg> but irrelevant (lrf, V unir gur Obet ba zl fperra).
Only graduation counts, IIUC (1).

Paul

(1) if I understand correctly
Back to top
David Haardt
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 2:25 am    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

bruno@ece.cmu.edu (Marcelo Bruno) wrote:
Quote:
I'm trying to compile a list of European academic degrees with their
(approximate) American equivalents. So far, here is what I've been
able to come up with:


U.S. England France Germany


N/A Bachelor's Licence Vordiplom

B.S/B.A. B. w/Honours Maîtrise Magister or Diplom
or Diplôme
(grandes écoles)

M.S/M.A. M.Phil D.E.A Magister or Diplom
(with thesis)

J.D. ? ? ?

M.D. ? ? ?


Ph.D. Ph.D. Docteur Doktor
(Dr-Ing,Dr.rer.nat,etc)

OK, here are my comments:

Nowadays, probably 99% of three-year bachelor's degrees in England,
Northern Ireland, and Wales are with "honours". It has become so
standard that it's hardly mentioned anymore. Degrees without honours
("ordinary degrees") are in 99% of cases only for those who do very
badly on their final exams. In Scotland, the system is different, and
honours there do play a role, but I won't touch upon that here. The
same is true of other Commonwealth countries.

Many Germans translate their "Vordiplom" as a "bachelor's degree". In
my opinion, this is a vast exaggeration. While it's true that the
number of years of total schooling may be equivalent between a
Vordiplom and a UK bachelor's degree (with honours, see above), the
standard is not equivalent. Moreover, 8-year Gymnasien are currently
being introduced in Germany as opposed to the traditional 9-year
Gymnasien, which will take that year away anyway. Again moreover, the
currently being introduced bachelor's degrees in Germany take three
years, therefore one year longer than the Vordiplom. Lastly moreover,
the Vordiplom is not a genuine degree, only an intermediate step,
while a bachelor's degree is a genuine stand-alone degree. Therefore,
I am a strict opponent of equating the Vordiplom to a bachelor's
degree.

A German Fachhochschule (FH) degree (called FH-Diplom) is probably
equivalent to a bachelor's degree (either a US degree or a UK degree
with honours, again see above). You may want to include that.

A traditional German university degree however (Magister or Diplom) is
in my opinion clearly equivalent to a master's degree, not to a
bachelor's or master's degree.

The UK equivalent of a US master's degree is in my opinion a standard
MSc/MA. The MPhil is a degree which is based solely upon research, and
which has much higher requirements with respect to originality etc.
than a US master's degree. Therefore, I do not support equating a US
master's degree to a UK MPhil.

While PhD/Docteur/Doktor are equivalent in the sense that they are the
highest and terminal university degree, it may be doubted that Docteur
and Doktor on the one hand are really as advanced as a US or UK PhD on
the other hand. Especially in Germany, there's no additional course
work at all, and the vast majority of German doctoral theses don't
contain any originality. This may be an arrogant statement, maybe it
is, but nevertheless a true one in my opinion. Unfortunately, they
often rather look like very long master's theses. This is however
changing a lot, with Graduiertenkollegs being introduced to attract
high-calibre students, with genuine doctoral course work being
required and higher thesis standards. So in my opinion the German
system is making huge progress at the moment with respect to doctoral
degrees. I'm not so familiar with French doctoral degrees but I
suspect that the general tendency might be similar to what I wrote
about Germany, although not as pronounced.

Hope this helps. Feel free to criticise, counter, etc.

Best regards,
David Haardt
Back to top
Marcelo Bruno
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 4:50 am    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

inge <wildwusel@gmx.de> wrote in message news:<40F13E55.5DC937AF@gmx.de>...
Quote:
Paul Schmitz-Josten wrote:



- get accepted at a university age 22.

How does the acceptance process actually work in Germany ? I was
under the impression that the German system guaranteed universal
access to all qualified students, i.e., any student who passed his/her
Abitur would have in theory the right to enroll in a university,
although he/she might not get into his
first-choice school due to overcrowding and may be put in a waiting
list, etc...
From your message though, it looks like some kind of selection process
actually exists, although I doubt it is quite as structured as in
England or the US, where universities use multiple criteria to accept
or reject candidates and there is no guarantee of universal access.
Could you please clarify ?

Thanks.
Back to top
Delila
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 5:43 am    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

"Marcelo Bruno" <bruno@ece.cmu.edu> wrote in message
news:5f709a92.0407111450.42a75ec3@posting.google.com...
Quote:

How does the acceptance process actually work in Germany ? I was
under the impression that the German system guaranteed universal
access to all qualified students, i.e., any student who passed his/her
Abitur would have in theory the right to enroll in a university,
although he/she might not get into his
first-choice school due to overcrowding and may be put in a waiting
list, etc...
From your message though, it looks like some kind of selection process
actually exists, although I doubt it is quite as structured as in
England or the US, where universities use multiple criteria to accept
or reject candidates and there is no guarantee of universal access.
Could you please clarify ?


I remember hearing stuff about a "Numerus Clausus" 25-30 years ago. I
don't know if that's still the case.


D.








-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
Back to top
Guybrush Threepwood
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 6:48 am    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

Quote:
OK, here are my comments:

Nowadays, probably 99% of three-year bachelor's degrees in England,
Northern Ireland, and Wales are with "honours". It has become so
standard that it's hardly mentioned anymore. Degrees without honours
("ordinary degrees") are in 99% of cases only for those who do very
badly on their final exams. In Scotland, the system is different, and
honours there do play a role, but I won't touch upon that here. The
same is true of other Commonwealth countries.

Not so much.

In South Africa, an honours degree is an optional 4th year after a 3 year
bachelor's degree. I believe its similar in Australia. In Canada, an
honours degree indicates a higher grade point average, more courses, and
more of a concentration in one area as opposed to an ordinary "major"
degree. Probably around 20-30% of Canadian degrees are honours.

The British model of 3 year honours degrees is more of an oddity, I think.
I'd be interested to know of similar systems elsewhere.


Guy
Back to top
Paul Schmitz-Josten
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 1:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

Marcelo Bruno in <5f709a92.0407111450.42a75ec3@posting.google.com>:

Quote:
Paul Schmitz-Josten wrote:

Ehm - actually, I didn't write anything you quoted, except for one blank
line ;->

Quote:
- get accepted at a university age 22.

How does the acceptance process actually work in Germany ? I was
under the impression that the German system guaranteed universal
access to all qualified students, i.e., any student who passed his/her
Abitur would have in theory the right to enroll in a university,
although he/she might not get into his
first-choice school due to overcrowding and may be put in a waiting
list, etc...

That is correct.

Quote:
From your message though, it looks like some kind of selection process
actually exists, [...]

Nope - you just misinterpreted Inge and quoted too selective:

She wrote:
|- finish school aged 20
|
|- try to get into vocational training, because, honestly, you need the
|money. Lose one year.
|
|- do a social year [...] Finally start writing your letters to get accepted at a
|university.

This makes the difference: In her scenario, the prospective student applies
for a place at the university one or two years after Abitur. That means
that

|- get accepted at a university age 22.

is due to the student's planning and not the result of any official
selection process.

(selection in German universities?)
Quote:
although I doubt it is quite as structured as in
England or the US, where universities use multiple criteria to accept
or reject candidates and there is no guarantee of universal access.
Could you please clarify ?

AFAIK Abitur grants access to any subject in every German public university
if you can only afford to wait long enough.

Ciao,

Paul
Back to top
David Haardt
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2004 1:48 pm    Post subject: Re: Equivalence of U.S. and European degrees Reply with quote

Guybrush Threepwood <guy@hotmail.com> wrote:
Quote:
OK, here are my comments:

Nowadays, probably 99% of three-year bachelor's degrees in England,
Northern Ireland, and Wales are with "honours". It has become so
standard that it's hardly mentioned anymore. Degrees without honours
("ordinary degrees") are in 99% of cases only for those who do very
badly on their final exams. In Scotland, the system is different, and
honours there do play a role, but I won't touch upon that here. The
same is true of other Commonwealth countries.

Not so much.

In South Africa, an honours degree is an optional 4th year after a 3 year
bachelor's degree. I believe its similar in Australia. In Canada, an
honours degree indicates a higher grade point average, more courses, and
more of a concentration in one area as opposed to an ordinary "major"
degree. Probably around 20-30% of Canadian degrees are honours.

The British model of 3 year honours degrees is more of an oddity, I think.
I'd be interested to know of similar systems elsewhere.

Sorry for lack of clarity. I wanted to express that "[t]he same [as in
Scotland] is true of other Commonwealth countries". You are of course
totally right about South Africa, and it's also similar in Australia
and New Zealand.

The system in place in England, Northern Ireland, and Wales is
interesting inasmuch as it is highly specialised. In economics for
instance, which is where I come from, a good UK bachelor's degree
includes many things which are taught in first-year graduate courses
in the United States. This specialisation has of course both
advantages and disadvantages, needless to say.

David
Back to top
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Vocaboly.com Forum Index -> soc.college.admissions All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum




Powered by phpBB