What's the plural for 'business'?
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What's the plural for 'business'?

 
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Pete
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Posted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 6:21 pm    Post subject: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Is the plural form of 'business' still 'business' or 'businesses'?

Businesses today highly depend on computerized operations.

I visit many small businesses on the 3rd Ave.

New businesses' surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 7:16 pm    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Pete wrote:
Quote:
Is the plural form of 'business' still 'business' or 'businesses'?

Businesses today highly depend on computerized operations.

Yep.

Quote:
I visit many small businesses on the 3rd Ave.

Yep.

Quote:
New businesses' surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

That is certainly okay with "New business" as an entity. Alternatively
"New business" can be a concept, in which case:

New business's surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.
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Guest






Posted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 10:06 pm    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

While agreing with Pete's comments on the plural form of "business", I
have a problem with the style of the two sentences quoted in the
original post. Wouldn't it be more natural to say either: "Businesses
today are highly dependent on computers", or "Today's businesses are
highly dependent on computers"? One could also say (depending on the
context) "Modern businesses are highly dependent on computers". The
word "operations" is an unnecessary piece of jargon.

The second quoted sentence, "New businesses' surviving rate on its
first year has been improved over the years", is extraordinarily
clumsy. Again, depending on the context, I would probably have written:
"Fewer small businesses are collapsing before their first birthday" or
"More small business are surviving into their second year".

Roger Tidy
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CDB
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:06 am    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Quote:
Is the plural form of 'business' still 'business' or 'businesses'?

Businesses today highly depend on computerized operations.

I visit many small businesses on the 3rd Ave.

New businesses' surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

The plural form is "businesses".

The examples that you used are not entirely idiomatic. In the first,
"highly depend" would be better expressed as "are highly dependent".

The second example as written means "I habitually visit many small
businesses..."; it's fine if that is what you intended.

Changing the last example as little as possible, I would make it "The
survival rate of new businesses in their first year has improved over
the years," or "A new business's chances of surviving its first year
have improved...."
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Steve MacGregor
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:27 am    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Pete wrote:

Quote:
Is the plural form of 'business' still 'business' or 'businesses'?

The plural of "business" has =never= been "business"; it has always
been "businesses".

--
Stefano
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Mark Brader
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:57 am    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

"Pete":
Quote:
Is the plural form of 'business' still 'business' or 'businesses'?

Stefano MacGregor:
Quote:
The plural of "business" has =never= been "business"...

I don't think Pete meant "still" in that sense.

"Then I saw two... is it 'deers'?"
"No, it's still 'deer', even in the plural."
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "However, 0.02283% failure might be better than 50%
msb@vex.net | failure, depending on your needs." --Norman Diamond
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Mark Brader
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:09 am    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

"Pete":
Quote:
New businesses' surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

The possessive plural "new businesses'" is fine, but "its" should be
plural to agree (or else you could substitute "the"). Also, "on" is
the wrong preposition; "in" is the best choice. And the idiom is not
"surviving rate", but "survival rate".

New businesses' survival rate in their first year has been improved
over the years.

Quote:
Alternatively "New business" can be a concept, in which case:

New business's surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

Nonsense. Certainly "new business" (as a mass noun) can refer to a
concept, but with that concept there is no starting point to measure
the first year from. This sentence requires "business" to be a
count noun, which therefore has to be in the plural.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "One thing that surprises you about this business
msb@vex.net | is the surprises." -- Tim Baker

My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Skitt
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:27 am    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Mark Brader wrote:
Quote:
"Pete":

New businesses' surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

The possessive plural "new businesses'" is fine, but "its" should be
plural to agree (or else you could substitute "the"). Also, "on" is
the wrong preposition; "in" is the best choice. And the idiom is not
"surviving rate", but "survival rate".

New businesses' survival rate in their first year has been improved
over the years.

Alternatively "New business" can be a concept, in which case:

New business's surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

Nonsense. Certainly "new business" (as a mass noun) can refer to a
concept, but with that concept there is no starting point to measure
the first year from. This sentence requires "business" to be a
count noun, which therefore has to be in the plural.

Google on "business failure rate" or "business survival rate", then try the
other forms. The predominant (and correct) usage will become very apparent.
--
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 2:34 pm    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Mark Brader wrote:
Quote:

New business's surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

Nonsense. Certainly "new business" (as a mass noun) can refer to a
concept, but with that concept there is no starting point to measure
the first year from. This sentence requires "business" to be a
count noun, which therefore has to be in the plural.

Your Nonsense doubled fains paxies and no return!

"there is no starting point to measure the first year from" ???

Each business, whatever concept you have of business, measures its
first year from the start of it's first year?

Dunnit?
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Mark Brader
Guest





Posted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:17 pm    Post subject: Re: What's the plural for 'business'? Reply with quote

Troy Steadman and I (Mark Brader) wrote:
Quote:
New business's surviving rate on its first year has been improved
over the years.

Nonsense. Certainly "new business" (as a mass noun) can refer to a
concept, but with that concept there is no starting point to measure
the first year from. This sentence requires "business" to be a
count noun, which therefore has to be in the plural.

Your Nonsense doubled fains paxies and no return!

!

Quote:
"there is no starting point to measure the first year from" ???

Each business, whatever concept you have of business, measures its

Exactly. *Each* business, which means you're using a sense where it's
a count noun.

Quote:
first year from the start of it's first year?

"It's"?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I asked you for a *good* reason,
msb@vex.net | not a *terrific* one!" --Maxwell Smart (Agent 86)

My text in this article is in the public domain.
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