Rarely vs Seldom
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Rarely vs Seldom
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seashell
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Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 7:52 pm    Post subject: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms "rarely" and
"seldom"?
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 8:20 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

seashell wrote:
Quote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms "rarely" and
"seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 8:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Troy Steadman wrote:
Quote:
seashell wrote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms "rarely" and
"seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.

There is possibly a slight nuance:

1) "He rarely went to Paris"
2) "He seldom went to Paris"

The first is emotionally neutral whereas the second implies he didn't
like Paris much.
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John Dean
Guest





Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2005 10:58 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Troy Steadman wrote:
Quote:
Troy Steadman wrote:
seashell wrote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms "rarely"
and "seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.

There is possibly a slight nuance:

1) "He rarely went to Paris"
2) "He seldom went to Paris"

The first is emotionally neutral whereas the second implies he didn't
like Paris much.

Not to me.
And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.
--
John Dean
Oxford
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Michael Nitabach
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 12:15 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in
news:dbtsr5$7af$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:

Quote:
Troy Steadman wrote:
Troy Steadman wrote:
seashell wrote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms
"rarely" and "seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.

There is possibly a slight nuance:

1) "He rarely went to Paris"
2) "He seldom went to Paris"

The first is emotionally neutral whereas the second implies he
didn't like Paris much.

Not to me.
And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

--
Mike Nitabach
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Jim Lawton
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 12:17 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 08:52:52 -0500, seashell9921@webtv.net (seashell) wrote:

Quote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms "rarely" and
"seldom"?


My Collins uses "seldom" as its explanation of "rarely" and vice versa. I feel
no difference whatsoever.
--
Jim
"a single species has come to dominate ...
reproducing at bacterial levels, almost as an
infectious plague envelops its host"
http://tinyurl.com/c88xs
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 7:09 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Michael Nitabach wrote:
Quote:
"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in

And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Near synonyms don't exit. If your wife was nearly a virgin when you met
her, if you nearly catch your plane....

Either they are synonyms or there is some nuance between them.
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Charles Riggs
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 2:45 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 13:15:48 -0500, Michael Nitabach
<mnitabach@acedsl.com> wrote:

Quote:
"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in
news:dbtsr5$7af$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:

Troy Steadman wrote:
Troy Steadman wrote:
seashell wrote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms
"rarely" and "seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.

There is possibly a slight nuance:

1) "He rarely went to Paris"
2) "He seldom went to Paris"

The first is emotionally neutral whereas the second implies he
didn't like Paris much.

Not to me.
And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Me too.

("Me too"s were frowned upon in AUE's Golden Age, but Dena Jo changed
all that. Now they are acceptable.)
--
Charles Riggs
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John Dean
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 5:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Troy Steadman wrote:
Quote:
Michael Nitabach wrote:
"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in

And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Near synonyms don't exit. If your wife was nearly a virgin when you
met her, if you nearly catch your plane....

"nearly a virgin" isn't a synonym for anything. "Near synonyms" aren't
phrases that include the word "near" or "nearly"
Quote:

Either they are synonyms or there is some nuance between them.

Of course there's a nuance. That's why they're near. My wife was virgin.
My wife was chaste.
I met her. I encountered her.
I replied to your post. I responded to it. I answered it.
--
John Dean
Oxford
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Laura F. Spira
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 6:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

John Dean wrote:

Quote:
Troy Steadman wrote:

Michael Nitabach wrote:

"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in


And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Near synonyms don't exit. If your wife was nearly a virgin when you
met her, if you nearly catch your plane....


"nearly a virgin" isn't a synonym for anything. "Near synonyms" aren't
phrases that include the word "near" or "nearly"

Either they are synonyms or there is some nuance between them.


Of course there's a nuance. That's why they're near. My wife was virgin.
My wife was chaste.
I met her. I encountered her.
I replied to your post. I responded to it. I answered it.

Yes, but you missed the most important statement. Near synonyms are,
apparently, always with us. They never leave. They remain. They stay.

--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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Robert Lieblich
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 7:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Troy Steadman wrote:
Quote:

Michael Nitabach wrote:
"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in

And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Near synonyms don't exit. If your wife was nearly a virgin when you met
her, if you nearly catch your plane....

Either they are synonyms or there is some nuance between them.

A quick google search reveals that "near synonym" is a term used by at
least some linguists, and clearly it has meaning for them. Perhaps
you should argue that we should eschew it as jargon, since its
existence seems indisputable.

Compare "nearly unique" and "very unique." And "nearly caught the
plane" is easily understood by anyone fluent in English. The
interesting one is "near miss" (and you'll find a fair amount of
commentary on that phrase in the archives).

If -- perish the thought -- you're concerned with what the word
"synonym" means in actual English usage, run the word through a few
online dictionaries. It took me all of a couple of minutes to find
three that say that a synonym is a word that means the same "or nearly
the same" as another word. A fourth uses "almost the same."(1) This
would suggest that "near synonym" is a redundancy rather than an
oxymoron. Your view also makes "exact synonym" superfluous, yet that
phrase too is in common English use.

There's more to the language than your opinions -- or mine, for that
matter.

(1) To be fair, the good old Concise Oxford, which is so concise as to
be nearly useless,(2) takes the same absolutist view you do. But maybe
it's just being concise.

(2) Am I allowed to say "nearly useless"?

--
Bob Lieblich
Nearly right
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Troy Steadman
Guest





Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2005 7:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Robert Lieblich wrote:
Quote:
Troy Steadman wrote:

Michael Nitabach wrote:
"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in

And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Near synonyms don't exit. If your wife was nearly a virgin when you met
her, if you nearly catch your plane....

Either they are synonyms or there is some nuance between them.

A quick google search reveals that "near synonym" is a term used by at
least some linguists, and clearly it has meaning for them. Perhaps
you should argue that we should eschew it as jargon, since its
existence seems indisputable.

Compare "nearly unique" and "very unique." And "nearly caught the
plane" is easily understood by anyone fluent in English. The
interesting one is "near miss" (and you'll find a fair amount of
commentary on that phrase in the archives).

If -- perish the thought -- you're concerned with what the word
"synonym" means in actual English usage, run the word through a few
online dictionaries. It took me all of a couple of minutes to find
three that say that a synonym is a word that means the same "or nearly
the same" as another word. A fourth uses "almost the same."(1) This
would suggest that "near synonym" is a redundancy rather than an
oxymoron. Your view also makes "exact synonym" superfluous, yet that
phrase too is in common English use.

There's more to the language than your opinions -- or mine, for that
matter.

(1) To be fair, the good old Concise Oxford, which is so concise as to
be nearly useless,(2) takes the same absolutist view you do. But maybe
it's just being concise.

(2) Am I allowed to say "nearly useless"?

--
Bob Lieblich
Nearly right

I have three Concise Oxford's stuffed full of notes and I am not about
to ditch them for anything new-fangled. I withdraw "Near synonyms don't
exist" and I accept '"nearly caught the plane" is easily understood by
anyone fluent in English'.

What I do not accept is that people can be sure two words are "nearly"
synonyms without having the remotest inkling of what differentiates
them.

I think "Rarely" picks up a bit of class from Rare=Precious which
"Seldom" can never achieve. Therein lies the nuance. I would like you
all to have the courage to climb off your fence:

A) The words are synonyms.

....or...

b) This is the nuance between them...

A...? Or...B?
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Michael Nitabach
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 25, 2005 12:03 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

Charles Riggs <chriggs@eircom.net> wrote in
news:1rk6e1tfeol9k1u69vgo2hccf8t9m6pqoj@4ax.com:

Quote:
On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 13:15:48 -0500, Michael Nitabach
mnitabach@acedsl.com> wrote:

"John Dean" <john-dean@frag.lineone.net> wrote in
news:dbtsr5$7af$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk:

Troy Steadman wrote:
Troy Steadman wrote:
seashell wrote:
What is the difference in meaning/usage between the terms
"rarely" and "seldom"?

"rarely" = not very often, very occasionally = "seldom"

Synonyms IMO.

There is possibly a slight nuance:

1) "He rarely went to Paris"
2) "He seldom went to Paris"

The first is emotionally neutral whereas the second implies he
didn't like Paris much.

Not to me.
And I see "seldom" and "rarely" as near synonyms.

Same here.

Me too.

("Me too"s were frowned upon in AUE's Golden Age, but Dena Jo
changed
all that. Now they are acceptable.)

I like "me too". What else can you say when that's what you mean? "I,
too"?

--
Mike Nitabach
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mark
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 25, 2005 12:16 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

While recovering from a recent, uncomfortable transmembrification,
Michael Nitabach (mnitabach@acedsl.com) was heard to remark...
Quote:
Charles Riggs <chriggs@eircom.net> wrote in
news:1rk6e1tfeol9k1u69vgo2hccf8t9m6pqoj@4ax.com:
("Me too"s were frowned upon in AUE's Golden Age, but Dena Jo
changed
all that. Now they are acceptable.)

I like "me too". What else can you say when that's what you mean? "I,
too"?

There's two possible reasons. One could be the ever-present comma
nitpickery: mayhap it should be "me, too"?

The other, USENET-wide reason, would be that "me too" tends to raise
the hackles of all but the most hackle-less veteran reader. "AOL" is
the preferred term, as although she repeats the initial error of making
a "me too" post, the author is at least making a weak effort at
inserting humour into her post, showing all and sundry that she's aware
of the hackles she's raising.


--
"The [New York] Times is not a bad little newspaper in some ways. But
when it comes to things like egg balancing, it is out of its depth."
- Cecil Adams, /More of the Straight Dope/
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Michael Nitabach
Guest





Posted: Mon Jul 25, 2005 1:41 am    Post subject: Re: Rarely vs Seldom Reply with quote

mark <m.gallagher@student.canberra.edu.au> wrote in
news:MPG.1d4e86068dcbfc98989f6b@news.individual.net:

Quote:
While recovering from a recent, uncomfortable transmembrification,
Michael Nitabach (mnitabach@acedsl.com) was heard to remark...
Charles Riggs <chriggs@eircom.net> wrote in
news:1rk6e1tfeol9k1u69vgo2hccf8t9m6pqoj@4ax.com:
("Me too"s were frowned upon in AUE's Golden Age, but Dena Jo
changed
all that. Now they are acceptable.)

I like "me too". What else can you say when that's what you mean?
"I, too"?

There's two possible reasons. One could be the ever-present comma
nitpickery: mayhap it should be "me, too"?

What "reasons" are you talking about?

Quote:
The other, USENET-wide reason, would be that "me too" tends to
raise the hackles of all but the most hackle-less veteran reader.
"AOL" is the preferred term, as although she repeats the initial
error of making a "me too" post, the author is at least making a
weak effort at inserting humour into her post, showing all and
sundry that she's aware of the hackles she's raising.

Huh?

--
Mike Nitabach
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