Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped"
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Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped"
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gyp
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 12:43 am    Post subject: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it seems to
be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (for me) if there was
some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to find one.

Thanks for any help.
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eromlignod
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 1:18 am    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

gyp wrote:
Quote:
Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it
seems to
be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (for me) if there
was
some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to find one.

Thanks for any help.

I assume you mean the verb form of "gyp". Around here it means to be
cheated and I very much associate it with Gypsies, which abound here in
Missouri. I wouldn't normally call a Gypsy a "Gyp", as the dictionary
gives for the noun meaning, but this may be a term in other regions.
The most common use in this area would be something like, "I got gypped
on my last car", meaning that I was cheated or got a bad deal. We also
say "I got took", or "screwed".

A similar slang verb, though slightly different in meaning, is "jew".
It would be used like, "I got jewed out of it", or "I jewed him down on
it". The former implies a swindle while the latter implies shrewd
negotiation of a price.

Don
Kansas City
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Andrew Gwilliam
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 4:39 am    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

On 4 Apr 2005 12:18:07 -0700, eromlignod wrote:

Quote:
gyp wrote:
Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it
seems to
be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (for me) if there
was
some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to find one.

Thanks for any help.

I assume you mean the verb form of "gyp". Around here it means to be
cheated and I very much associate it with Gypsies, which abound here in
Missouri. I wouldn't normally call a Gypsy a "Gyp", as the dictionary
gives for the noun meaning, but this may be a term in other regions.
The most common use in this area would be something like, "I got gypped
on my last car", meaning that I was cheated or got a bad deal. We also
say "I got took", or "screwed".

A similar slang verb, though slightly different in meaning, is "jew".
It would be used like, "I got jewed out of it", or "I jewed him down on
it". The former implies a swindle while the latter implies shrewd
negotiation of a price.

cf. "welsh"

--
Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless_pit" with "silverhelm"
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Matti Lamprhey
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 5:25 am    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"gyp" <gyp@dnac48.dabsol.co.uk> wrote...
Quote:
Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it
seems to be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (for me) if
there was some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to
find one.

This is an extract from a couple of recent mailings from Michael
Quinion's World Wide Words site:
http://www.worldwidewords.org/maillist/index.htm

8 Jan 2005
Q. My father-in-law often referred to something painful as "giving
me gyp". This does not seem to correlate to the other meaning of
"cheat". Any suggestions? [Joan Wilton, Canada]

A. "Gyp" is a moderately common expression, mainly in the UK, but
also in Commonwealth countries, though my gut feeling is that it's
now mostly used by older people. It appears in fixed phrases that
refer to some part of the body being painful, as in this example
from the London Evening Standard in August 2003: "I turned my ankle
in the game and it's still giving me gyp."

The other meaning you give has no connection - it's a derogatory
term that is usually said to derive from the word "gypsy" (see
http://quinion.com?G91P). The sense of pain seems to be connected
with a northern English dialect word, variously spelled "gip" or
"jip", that only ever appeared in the form "to give somebody or
something jip". It could mean to give a person or an object a sound
thrashing (one example is of a man giving a carpet a beating), or
generally to treat roughly or to cause pain.

We're not certain where it comes from, but the English Dialect
Dictionary gives one sense of the word as "to arouse to greater
exertions by means of some sudden, unexpected action". That fits
with the suggestion in the Oxford English Dictionary that it's a
contracted form of "gee-up", a conventionalised version of the cry
one utters to get a horse to move. Presumably the pain sense
evolved through the excessive use of that unexpected action in
persuading a person or animal to do one's bidding.

-----
12 Feb 2005

GYP You may remember the item in the newsletter of 8 January about
"gyp", in the sense of something that causes one pain ("My ankle is
giving me gyp"). I said then, correctly, that it was not connected
with gypsies, and especially not with the derogatory verb "to gyp",
to cheat or defraud, but came from English dialect. However, Chris
Colton e-mailed querying "gyppy", as in "gyppy tummy", a term for
diarrhoea. This does have the same origin as "gypsy" - a mangled
form of "Egyptian". "Gyppy tummy" is noted by Eric Partridge as
World War Two services slang for the ailment suffered by British
forces in the North African desert campaign, and it was a phrase
that was common in Britain after the War. Having recently returned
from Egypt with a case of it, I can attest to its power! It seems
certain that "gyppy" was influenced in its creation by the pain
sense of "gyp", but also built on "gyppy" or "gippy", a slang term
for an Egyptian that can be traced back to Lord Kitchener's army in
Egypt in the 1880s and 1890s.

---------------

Matti
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eromlignod
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 8:02 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

Andrew Gwilliam wrote:
Quote:
On 4 Apr 2005 12:18:07 -0700, eromlignod wrote:
A similar slang verb, though slightly different in meaning, is
"jew".
It would be used like, "I got jewed out of it", or "I jewed him
down on
it". The former implies a swindle while the latter implies shrewd
negotiation of a price.

cf. "welsh"


We have the term "welsh" (though it is more commonly said "welch" here)
that has a slightly different meaning. To "welch" on a bet is to
renege on paying monies owed.

Don
Kansas City
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Father Ignatius
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Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 9:04 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"eromlignod" <eromlignod@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1112709730.963225.249840@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...

Quote:
We have the term "welsh" (though it is more commonly said "welch"
here)
that has a slightly different meaning. To "welch" on a bet is to
renege on paying monies owed.

That is simply an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh"; for example Robert
Graves was in "the Welch Regiment" and, last time I heard, they still
used that spelling.
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the Omrud
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 9:24 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

Father Ignatius had it:

Quote:
"eromlignod" <eromlignod@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1112709730.963225.249840@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...

We have the term "welsh" (though it is more commonly said "welch"
here)
that has a slightly different meaning. To "welch" on a bet is to
renege on paying monies owed.

That is simply an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh"; for example Robert
Graves was in "the Welch Regiment" and, last time I heard, they still
used that spelling.

It's spelled that way on the commemorative arch at Ypres - I was
worried until I checked that it really was a valid form.

--
David
=====
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Father Ignatius
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 9:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"gyp" <gyp@dnac48.dabsol.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Xns962EC78F3AD0528762153tmichanet@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net...
Quote:
Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it
seems to
be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (for me) if there
was
some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to find one.

The COED says it's "C19: of unknown origina" which suggests that it is
not from "gypsy", or this would be known, and would presumably be of
much earlier origin.

An alternative meaning of "gyp" is "a college servant at the
universities of Cambridge and Durham", and suggests that this might be
from "gippo", which means "a menial kitchen servant", this word being
derived from the French _jupeau_, which means "a man's short tunic"
(modern French has _jupe_ = "skirt"). This meaning, I guess, would
match as closely as the "gypsy" theory to poor, mean, cheating sort of
person, who might cause one distress.

In some forms of CommonwelathE, such as ZimE and, I think, AusE and
KiwE, "gippo" is used in a related sense of cheating, e.g. "I gippoed a
repair on the motorbike", meaning an ad hoc fiddling around that
fortunately worked. I suspect that this might suggest a link to earlier
Army slang relating to "Gyppo" = "Egyptian", relating to the experience
of the various armies of the British Empire in the recent emergency.

I always saw "My back is giving me gip" written with this variant
spelling, which the COED merely acknowledges. Maybe it means, "Oh, my
aching back, you can't get good help nowadays" <ObSmiley>.
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the Omrud
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 9:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

Father Ignatius had it:

Quote:
"gyp" <gyp@dnac48.dabsol.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Xns962EC78F3AD0528762153tmichanet@ptn-nntp-reader03.plus.net...
Does anyone have the etymology of gyp? From a bit of Googling it
seems to be from "gypsy", but I'm not sure. It'd be great (
for me) if there was
some other equally convincing etymology, but I'm unable to find one.

The COED says it's "C19: of unknown origina" which suggests that it is
not from "gypsy", or this would be known, and would presumably be of
much earlier origin.

An alternative meaning of "gyp" is "a college servant at the
universities of Cambridge and Durham", and suggests that this might be
from "gippo", which means "a menial kitchen servant", this word being
derived from the French _jupeau_, which means "a man's short tunic"
(modern French has _jupe_ = "skirt"). This meaning, I guess, would
match as closely as the "gypsy" theory to poor, mean, cheating sort of
person, who might cause one distress.

In some forms of CommonwelathE, such as ZimE and, I think, AusE and
KiwE, "gippo" is used in a related sense of cheating, e.g. "I gippoed a
repair on the motorbike", meaning an ad hoc fiddling around that
fortunately worked. I suspect that this might suggest a link to earlier
Army slang relating to "Gyppo" = "Egyptian", relating to the experience
of the various armies of the British Empire in the recent emergency.

"gippo" or "gyppo" is one of the UK regional variants (East Midlands)
of the term which has recently been generalised as "chav". Here in
the North West we have "scally"; "pikey" and "towny" are also known.
I had assumed that "gyppo" came from gypsy, but perhaps it goes back
further.

--
David
=====
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Matti Lamprhey
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"Father Ignatius" <FatherIgnatius@ANTISPAMananzi.co.za> wrote...
Quote:
"eromlignod" <eromlignod@aol.com> wrote...

We have the term "welsh" (though it is more commonly said "welch"
here) that has a slightly different meaning. To "welch" on a bet is
to renege on paying monies owed.

That is simply an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh"; for example Robert
Graves was in "the Welch Regiment" and, last time I heard, they still
used that spelling.

Except that no-one has demonstrated an etymological connection between
"to welsh on a deal" and the Welsh or the Welch.

Matti
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Areff
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

Father Ignatius wrote:
Quote:
"eromlignod" <eromlignod@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1112709730.963225.249840@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
To "welch" on a bet is to
renege on paying monies owed.

That is simply an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh";

Uh-oh. Now you've gone and wook up Ron.

--
I repeat: Erk, this can't be!
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Father Ignatius
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:51 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"Matti Lamprhey" <matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote in message
news:3bfrhtF6hljkjU1@individual.net...

Quote:
Except that no-one has demonstrated an etymological connection between
"to welsh on a deal" and the Welsh or the Welch.

<blink> Is this really required?
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CDB
Guest





Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"Matti Lamprhey" <matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote in message
news:3bfrhtF6hljkjU1@individual.net...
Quote:
"Father Ignatius" <FatherIgnatius@ANTISPAMananzi.co.za> wrote...
"eromlignod" <eromlignod@aol.com> wrote...

We have the term "welsh" (though it is more commonly said "welch"
here) that has a slightly different meaning. To "welch" on a bet is
to renege on paying monies owed.

That is simply an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh"; for example Robert
Graves was in "the Welch Regiment" and, last time I heard, they still
used that spelling.

Except that no-one has demonstrated an etymological connection between
"to welsh on a deal" and the Welsh or the Welch.


Sociological connection, then. "Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a
thief..." CDB
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Matti Lamprhey
Guest





Posted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:01 am    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

"Father Ignatius" <FatherIgnatius@ANTISPAMananzi.co.za> wrote...
Quote:
"Matti Lamprhey" <matti@official-totally-reversed.com> wrote...

Except that no-one has demonstrated an etymological connection
between "to welsh on a deal" and the Welsh or the Welch.

blink> Is this really required?

You've snipped the bit where you implied that the "welch" in "to welch
on a bet" was an obsolescent spelling of "Welsh"; I'm saying that you
may not be correct in that.

(And you may perhaps have meant "obsolete" rather than "obsolescent",
but that's another storey.)

Matti
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gyp
Guest





Posted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:27 am    Post subject: Re: Etymology of "Gyp" / "gypped" Reply with quote

the Omrud <usenet.omrud@gmail.com> wrote in news:MPG.1cbcc0a5159872d59897e3
@news.ntlworld.com:

Quote:
"gippo" or "gyppo" is one of the UK regional variants (East Midlands)
of the term which has recently been generalised as "chav". Here in
the North West we have "scally"; "pikey" and "towny" are also known.
I had assumed that "gyppo" came from gypsy, but perhaps it goes back
further.

Gypsy should really be reserved for Roma Travellers. "Pikey" are
unrelated, and describes someone "travelling the turnpikes", but I got that
from a website that gives the "chav" etymology as the Romany Charva=child,
(that bit is true, but whethter there is a connection is questioned.)

These words are usually nasty words used by nasty people. A bit of
Googling shows that they're often used by racists in racist way. Sad
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