"Me too" or "You too"?
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"Me too" or "You too"?
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Maria Conlon
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 5:48 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

CyberCypher wrote, in part:

Quote:
But I see after a brief gooling of the exchange, that you
guys are right and I'm wrong about standard English, so I retract my
statement.

Is that anything like drooling?

(Sorry. It just stuck me funny -- and started my day off with a big
smile. Thank you very much.)

Maria Conlon
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Maria Conlon
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 5:48 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Adrian Bailey wrote:
Quote:
Michael wrote:

Hi,
With statements like:
"Nice to meet you."
"I look forward in meeting you."

Should the response be "Me too." or "You too."? Is it "me too" for
the first statement, and "you too" for the second?

"You too" for both, but neither usage is particularly acceptable. A
full response is preferred:

"Nice to meet you too".
"I look forward to meeting you too."

Sorry, that's just the way it is.

Well, perhaps "I *looked* forward to meeting you, too" or "I was looking
forward to meeting you, as well." (Both of which are a bit formal, and
possibly too wordy for some situations.)

And here are two possibilities I haven't seen mentioned yet: "My
pleasure!" or "The pleasure is all mine."

Maria Conlon
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CyberCypher
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 5:48 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Maria Conlon wrote on 09 Nov 2004:

Quote:
CyberCypher wrote, in part:

But I see after a brief gooling of the exchange, that you
guys are right and I'm wrong about standard English, so I retract my
statement.

Is that anything like drooling?

The way some people treat it, yes. Smile

Quote:
(Sorry. It just stuck me funny -- and started my day off with a big
smile. Thank you very much.)

Any time I can make a Republican smile instead of snarl is a good day
to die.


--
Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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Jess Askin
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

"Tony Cooper" <tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:khk0p0p47tp3ai7a8ckqkps93m13p98436@4ax.com...
Quote:
On 8 Nov 2004 20:54:25 -0800, dayzman@gmail.com (Michael) wrote:

People who speak English, especially Americans, don't consider this
type of greeting to be formal or subject to rules. A friendly
expression, a smile, and a firm handshake will serve you better than
worrying about the proper phraseology of greetings. Hold back on the
handshake, though, until the other person gives some indication of
doing so. Some people don't like shaking hands.

When I was growing up the rule was, it's OK to offer your hand to a man but
not a woman. If she puts her hand out, then it's OK to shake it (or kiss it,
if you're French and over 50).

But these days who knows what the rule is. It seems to me I don't see people
shaking hands as much as they used to; maybe that's out of uncertainty (is
he germ-o-phobic? will she sue me for sexual harassment?).

I'm also told that if you visit Japan, you can expect to shake hands a lot
more than you do here.
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Jess Askin
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

"FB" <fam.balducciNOSPAM@tin.it> wrote in message
news:777wj7sw8jud.2d1sf0r8flq1.dlg@40tude.net...
Quote:
On 9 Nov 2004 05:08:23 GMT, CyberCypher wrote:

"Nice to meet you too" is one standard response. In movies that like to
have lower-class women attempt to mimic their social superiors, you
will also hear "Likewise, I'm sure".

The response "Me too" is much too perfunctory, and "You too" is
illogical and not idiomatic.

Isn't "me, too", just wrong?

"It is nice to meet you"

"Me, too"? "Me, too" what?

It's not quite logical in this example, but with a small change it's
perfectly appropriate:

"I enjoyed our conversation."

"Me too."
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Jess Askin
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

"R J Valentine" <rj@smart.net> wrote in message
news:10p0n9baejg5c59@corp.supernews.com...
Quote:
On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 05:31:38 GMT Tony Cooper
tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> wrote:
And it's the prerogative of the socially senior person to offer. I hear
you're not supposed to hug HM The Queen; but, on her visit to The
Laurelplex (FLMAIA) a few years back, someone did just that (probably
called her "Hon" {= erkIPA [hVn]}, too).

So did Jimmy Carter, famously, when he was president. She was not amused.
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Sara Lorimer
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Jess Askin wrote:

Quote:
When I was growing up the rule was, it's OK to offer your hand to a man but
not a woman.

And that's why women have such a hard time figuring out what to do --
neither of us wants to go first.

--
SML

Dignity, always dignity.
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Donna Richoux
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Jess Askin <nospam@dontbother.net> wrote:

Quote:
"R J Valentine" <rj@smart.net> wrote in message
news:10p0n9baejg5c59@corp.supernews.com...
On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 05:31:38 GMT Tony Cooper
tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> wrote:
And it's the prerogative of the socially senior person to offer. I hear
you're not supposed to hug HM The Queen; but, on her visit to The
Laurelplex (FLMAIA) a few years back, someone did just that (probably
called her "Hon" {= erkIPA [hVn]}, too).

So did Jimmy Carter, famously, when he was president. She was not amused.

It supposed to have been the Queen *Mother*, not the Queen, and it was a
kiss, whether or not it was a hug:

TIME EUROPE
July 24, 2000, Vol. 156 No. 4

[The Queen Mother] dislikes Jimmy Carter because he
greeted her with a kiss on the lips. "Nobody has
done that since my husband died," she fumed.

Although the anecdote is repeated in a few places, I don't find any
reference to when it was supposed to have happened.

--
Best -- Donna Richoux
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Charles Riggs
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

On 9 Nov 2004 09:05:07 GMT, CyberCypher
<cybercypher@19-16-25-13-01-03.com> wrote:

Quote:
Vivek Khemka wrote on 09 Nov 2004:

Hi,

While I am in agreement with Mr. Cooper - i would like to add that
some expressions, as pointed out by Ms. CyberCypher the teacher,
are grammatically incorrect.

For example: While "You too" would be fine in response to "Nice to
meet you";

It's not fine in my dialect or in any standard dialect of English I
know of. "Nice to meet" is required before the "you too" to be fine.

I disagree, but I'll ask you just the same, what is the best response
to "Have a wonderful day!!" Is *any* response possible?

I heard it twice on the phone yesterday. Yes, sounded with the double,
at least, exclamation marks. I was so astonished I could only mumble
something those two times, so I'd like to be ready for the next time.
--
Charles Riggs

They are no accented letters in my email address
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Ben Zimmer
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 9:00 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Donna Richoux wrote:
Quote:

Jess Askin <nospam@dontbother.net> wrote:

"R J Valentine" <rj@smart.net> wrote in message
news:10p0n9baejg5c59@corp.supernews.com...
On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 05:31:38 GMT Tony Cooper
tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> wrote:
And it's the prerogative of the socially senior person to offer. I hear
you're not supposed to hug HM The Queen; but, on her visit to The
Laurelplex (FLMAIA) a few years back, someone did just that (probably
called her "Hon" {= erkIPA [hVn]}, too).

So did Jimmy Carter, famously, when he was president. She was not amused.

It supposed to have been the Queen *Mother*, not the Queen, and it was a
kiss, whether or not it was a hug:

TIME EUROPE
July 24, 2000, Vol. 156 No. 4

[The Queen Mother] dislikes Jimmy Carter because he
greeted her with a kiss on the lips. "Nobody has
done that since my husband died," she fumed.

Although the anecdote is repeated in a few places, I don't find any
reference to when it was supposed to have happened.

The first Nexis cite is from 1983:

Washington Post
Personalities, February 15, 1983
Meanwhile, back at the castle, the Queen Mother Elizabeth
let some friends know that she is nursing a grudge against
former president Jimmy Carter, who often seems to have
difficulty doing the right thing. Carter, a London weekly
Observer columnist reports, had inadvisedly kissed the
queen mother on the lips during one his visits to Britain.
"He is the only man, since my dear husband died, to have
the effrontery to kiss me on the lips," she reportedly
said. Her husband, George VI, died in 1952.
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Jess Askin
Guest





Posted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 9:00 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

"Ben Zimmer" <bgzimmer@midway.uchicago.edu> wrote in message
news:4191151E.35DC9264@midway.uchicago.edu...
Quote:


Donna Richoux wrote:

Jess Askin <nospam@dontbother.net> wrote:

"R J Valentine" <rj@smart.net> wrote in message
news:10p0n9baejg5c59@corp.supernews.com...
On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 05:31:38 GMT Tony Cooper
tony_cooper213@earthlink.net> wrote:
And it's the prerogative of the socially senior person to offer. I
hear
you're not supposed to hug HM The Queen; but, on her visit to The
Laurelplex (FLMAIA) a few years back, someone did just that
(probably
called her "Hon" {= erkIPA [hVn]}, too).

So did Jimmy Carter, famously, when he was president. She was not
amused.

It supposed to have been the Queen *Mother*, not the Queen, and it was a
kiss, whether or not it was a hug:

TIME EUROPE
July 24, 2000, Vol. 156 No. 4

[The Queen Mother] dislikes Jimmy Carter because he
greeted her with a kiss on the lips. "Nobody has
done that since my husband died," she fumed.

Although the anecdote is repeated in a few places, I don't find any
reference to when it was supposed to have happened.

The first Nexis cite is from 1983:

Washington Post
Personalities, February 15, 1983
Meanwhile, back at the castle, the Queen Mother Elizabeth
let some friends know that she is nursing a grudge against
former president Jimmy Carter, who often seems to have
difficulty doing the right thing. Carter, a London weekly
Observer columnist reports, had inadvisedly kissed the
queen mother on the lips during one his visits to Britain.
"He is the only man, since my dear husband died, to have
the effrontery to kiss me on the lips," she reportedly
said. Her husband, George VI, died in 1952.

OK, well now I'm not so sure. I have a feeling the Queen Mum didn't go
around whining to friends about untoward things people did in public.
Especially not to "friends" who would leak it to the press. I suspect this
is one of those cases where we'll never know whether she actually said it.
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Maria Conlon
Guest





Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 3:19 am    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

I, Maria Conlon, wrote:
Quote:
CyberCypher wrote, in part:

But I see after a brief gooling of the exchange, that you
guys are right and I'm wrong about standard English, so I retract my
statement.

Is that anything like drooling?

(Sorry. It just stuck me funny

Skitt's Law has struck again.

I'm stricken.

-- and started my day off with a big
Quote:
smile. Thank you very much.)

Maria Conlon
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CyberCypher
Guest





Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 6:06 am    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

Charles Riggs wrote on 10 Nov 2004:
Quote:
On 9 Nov 2004, CyberCypher wrote:
Vivek Khemka wrote on 09 Nov 2004:
While I am in agreement with Mr. Cooper - i would like to add
that some expressions, as pointed out by Ms. CyberCypher the
teacher, are grammatically incorrect.

For example: While "You too" would be fine in response to "Nice
to meet you";

It's not fine in my dialect or in any standard dialect of English
I know of. "Nice to meet" is required before the "you too" to be
fine.

I disagree,

I've already recanted.

Quote:
but I'll ask you just the same, what is the best
response to "Have a wonderful day!!" Is *any* response possible?

"I'll try!!!!!" in falsetto.

Quote:
I heard it twice on the phone yesterday. Yes, sounded with the
double, at least, exclamation marks. I was so astonished I could
only mumble something those two times, so I'd like to be ready for
the next time.



--
Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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R J Valentine
Guest





Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 12:20 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 10:30:59 -0800 Charles Riggs <chriggs@comcást.net> wrote:
....
} I disagree, but I'll ask you just the same, what is the best response
} to "Have a wonderful day!!" Is *any* response possible?
....

"No problem."

(also fine for responding to apologies, but not for responding to "Thank
you.")

--
R. J. Valentine <mailto:rj@smart.net>
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raymond o'hara
Guest





Posted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 12:33 pm    Post subject: Re: "Me too" or "You too"? Reply with quote

"Michael" <dayzman@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:429c032d.0411082054.755845dd@posting.google.com...
Quote:
Hi,
With statements like:
"Nice to meet you."
"I look forward in meeting you."

Should the response be "Me too." or "You too."? Is it "me too" for the
first statement, and "you too" for the second?

Regards,
Michael


Neither "Me too" or "You too" works for either case.
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