Out of Station == out of town
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Out of Station == out of town
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Ayaz Ahmed Khan
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Posted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 8:22 pm    Post subject: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

--
Ayaz Ahmed Khan, <http://fast-ce.org/linux>
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
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Peter Duncanson
Guest





Posted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 8:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

On 1 Oct 2004 14:22:53 GMT, Ayaz Ahmed Khan <resilient@myrealbox.com> wrote:

Quote:
Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being
away from one's normal place of work".

This relates to the meaning of
<quote>
station
1.
a. A place or position where a person or thing stands or is assigned to
stand; a post: a sentry station.
b. An area where a person is assigned to work.
....
<quote>
From: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=station

--
Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
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Odysseus
Guest





Posted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 10:25 am    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

Ayaz Ahmed Khan wrote:
Quote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.


I would expect "station" to refer to something like a depot or branch
office, perhaps in a foreign country or remote territory, rather than
the town in which it's located. Is that a possible reading in the
contexts where you encountered the phrase?

--
Odysseus
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nycram
Guest





Posted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 7:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In article <2s57hsF1gog4qU2@uni-berlin.de>, resilient@myrealbox.com
says...
Quote:
Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.


Is your friend a diplomat perhaps? I think diplomats "sent to lie

abroad" use the word "station" to refer to the place they are
posted/stationed at.

Gary
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Ayaz Ahmed Khan
Guest





Posted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 8:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

"Odysseus" typed:
Quote:
Ayaz Ahmed Khan wrote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

I would expect "station" to refer to something like a depot or branch
office, perhaps in a foreign country or remote territory, rather than
the town in which it's located. Is that a possible reading in the
contexts where you encountered the phrase?

I don't think so. The part of the article in which I recently encountered
the use of the phrase `out of station' to mean `out of town' is as
follows:

The delivery of ATM/Debit Cards is a slow process. Private banks
like MCB and Standard Chartered deliver cards within three to four
working days. On the contrary, some banks take a minimum of three
weeks. If you loose your card or it stops working and you happen to
be out of station, then you cannot apply for a new card. The
procedure requires your physical presence at the respective branch!
In the true essence of online banking, one should be able to go to
any branch and get a replacement card or, better still, request one
on the phone.

Before my third semester started, I was writing an application which
required the endorsement of all my class-mates in the form of their
individual signatures. Since one of the class-mate hadn't come back
from his vacation, he said he couldn't sign it because of being out of
station.

--
Ayaz Ahmed Khan, <http://fast-ce.org/linux>
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
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Ayaz Ahmed Khan
Guest





Posted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 8:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

"Peter Duncanson" typed:
Quote:
On 1 Oct 2004 14:22:53 GMT, Ayaz Ahmed Khan <resilient@myrealbox.com> wrote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being
away from one's normal place of work".

This relates to the meaning of
quote
station
1.
a. A place or position where a person or thing stands or is assigned to
stand; a post: a sentry station.
b. An area where a person is assigned to work.
...
quote
From: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=station

Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and
read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her
home-town.

--
Ayaz Ahmed Khan, <http://fast-ce.org/linux>
"This is Linux Country. On a quiet night, you can hear NT reboot."
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Peter Duncanson
Guest





Posted: Sat Oct 02, 2004 8:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

On 2 Oct 2004 14:22:09 GMT, Ayaz Ahmed Khan <resilient@myrealbox.com> wrote:

Quote:
"Peter Duncanson" typed:
On 1 Oct 2004 14:22:53 GMT, Ayaz Ahmed Khan <resilient@myrealbox.com> wrote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being
away from one's normal place of work".

This relates to the meaning of
quote
station
1.
a. A place or position where a person or thing stands or is assigned to
stand; a post: a sentry station.
b. An area where a person is assigned to work.
...
quote
From: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=station

Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and
read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her
home-town.

It seems likely that some people have widened the usage of the phrase.
Perhaps "out of station" sounds more formal and grander than "away from
home".

--
Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
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meirman
Guest





Posted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 7:41 am    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In alt.english.usage on 2 Oct 2004 14:22:09 GMT Ayaz Ahmed Khan
<resilient@myrealbox.com> posted:

Quote:
"Peter Duncanson" typed:
On 1 Oct 2004 14:22:53 GMT, Ayaz Ahmed Khan <resilient@myrealbox.com> wrote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

It is not a usage with which I am familiar. However it suggests to me "being
away from one's normal place of work".

This relates to the meaning of
quote
station
1.
a. A place or position where a person or thing stands or is assigned to
stand; a post: a sentry station.
b. An area where a person is assigned to work.
...
quote
From: http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=station

Yes. But I'm quite sure that the contexts in which I have heard and
read the phrase indicated the physical absence of the person from her
home-town.

Maybe she was stationed in her home-town, so she left her station and
town at the same time.

The military is always stationing people somewhere, and the diplomatic
corps. And I think the CIA. Don't they call the local boss the
station chief?

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.

Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis, 7 years
Chicago, 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
Baltimore 20 years
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meirman
Guest





Posted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 7:46 am    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In alt.english.usage on 2 Oct 2004 14:22:08 GMT Ayaz Ahmed Khan
<resilient@myrealbox.com> posted:

Quote:
"Odysseus" typed:
Ayaz Ahmed Khan wrote:

Does the phrase `out of station' mean `out of town'? I didn't find
any reference of the phrase in either OALD or CEED. I first read it
in an e-mail sent by a class-mate, and thinking that he may have been
wrong, I ignored it. But earlier today, I again found it so used in
an article published in a magazine.

I would expect "station" to refer to something like a depot or branch
office, perhaps in a foreign country or remote territory, rather than
the town in which it's located. Is that a possible reading in the
contexts where you encountered the phrase?

I don't think so. The part of the article in which I recently encountered
the use of the phrase `out of station' to mean `out of town' is as
follows:

The delivery of ATM/Debit Cards is a slow process. Private banks
like MCB and Standard Chartered deliver cards within three to four
working days. On the contrary, some banks take a minimum of three
weeks. If you loose your card or it stops working and you happen to
be out of station, then you cannot apply for a new card. The
procedure requires your physical presence at the respective branch!
In the true essence of online banking, one should be able to go to
any branch and get a replacement card or, better still, request one
on the phone.

I just requested one on the phone. I think they told me 5-7 business
days, and it came in about 7 calendar days. Visa.

The guy is a complainer, therefore probably a crank, therefore he
thinks he can use words like no one else does. That's my conclusion
and I'm sticking to it.
Quote:

Before my third semester started, I was writing an application which
required the endorsement of all my class-mates in the form of their
individual signatures. Since one of the class-mate hadn't come back
from his vacation, he said he couldn't sign it because of being out of
station.

I wish you guys would say where you're posting from, like I do.

s/ meirman If you are emailing me please
say if you are posting the same response.

Born west of Pittsburgh Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis, 7 years
Chicago, 6 years
Brooklyn NY 12 years
now in Baltimore 20 years
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Daniel James
Guest





Posted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 5:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In article news:<MPG.1bc8710b9916ab949896a2@news.individual.net>,
Nycram wrote:
Quote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

The old adage has it that a diplomat is someone whose job is to go
overseas to lie for their country, while a politician is someone
whose job is to lie at home (but not in The House ... except in
Teflon Tony's case).

Cheers,
Daniel.
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Peter Duncanson
Guest





Posted: Sun Oct 03, 2004 7:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 12:01:18 +0100, Daniel James
<wastebasket@nospam.aaisp.org> wrote:

Quote:
In article news:<MPG.1bc8710b9916ab949896a2@news.individual.net>,
Nycram wrote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

I see no typo.
Quote:

The old adage has it that a diplomat is someone whose job is to go
overseas to lie for their country,

The adage, as was once explained to me, is deliberately ambiguous: lie as in
sleep (i.e. dwell), versus lie as in being "economical with the truth".

Quote:
while a politician is someone
whose job is to lie at home (but not in The House ... except in
Teflon Tony's case).

Cheers,
Daniel.



--
Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
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Daniel James
Guest





Posted: Mon Oct 04, 2004 3:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In article news:<4fvvl0tf5ed78ahdo1t8emlrqv94nbl1ks@4ax.com>, Peter
Duncanson wrote:
Quote:
Nycram wrote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

I see no typo.
[snip]
... lie as in sleep (i.e. dwell) ...

I'm certainly conscious of the multiple possible meanings of "lie",
but I thought, from the context, that in this case the poster had
intended to type "live" rather than "lie".

[ ... and I admit I cheated a little with the "old adage", by
adding the rider about politicians and the swipe at our own
president.]

Cheers,
Daniel.
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Robin Bignall
Guest





Posted: Mon Oct 04, 2004 5:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 10:14:32 +0100, Daniel James
<wastebasket@nospam.aaisp.org> wrote:

Quote:
In article news:<4fvvl0tf5ed78ahdo1t8emlrqv94nbl1ks@4ax.com>, Peter
Duncanson wrote:
Nycram wrote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

I see no typo.
[snip]
... lie as in sleep (i.e. dwell) ...

I'm certainly conscious of the multiple possible meanings of "lie",
but I thought, from the context, that in this case the poster had
intended to type "live" rather than "lie".

'Lie abroad' appeals more to my cynicism, as indeed does the tendency

of some politicians to lay a broad, and be economical with the truth
about it.

--

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall

Hertfordshire
England
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Peter Duncanson
Guest





Posted: Mon Oct 04, 2004 6:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 10:14:32 +0100, Daniel James
<wastebasket@nospam.aaisp.org> wrote:

Quote:
In article news:<4fvvl0tf5ed78ahdo1t8emlrqv94nbl1ks@4ax.com>, Peter
Duncanson wrote:
Nycram wrote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

I see no typo.
[snip]
... lie as in sleep (i.e. dwell) ...

I'm certainly conscious of the multiple possible meanings of "lie",
but I thought, from the context, that in this case the poster had
intended to type "live" rather than "lie".

[ ... and I admit I cheated a little with the "old adage", by
adding the rider about politicians and the swipe at our own
president.]

Yes. I detected the personal rider.


Google fings a number of "lie abroad" quotes all of which either date the
saying to the 16th century or specifically attribute it to Sir Henry Wooton
Sr. English author and diplomat 1568-1639
http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/henry_wotton,_sr./
"An ambassador is an honest man sent abroad to lie for his country."

In a different quote Sir Henry also added a rider:
"An ambassador is a man of virtue sent to lie abroad for his country; a
news-writer is a man without virtue who lies at home for himself"


--
Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
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nycram
Guest





Posted: Mon Oct 04, 2004 11:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Out of Station == out of town Reply with quote

In article <i8f2m0160q0jln1i6c0vod9u7cbekraln7@4ax.com>,
mail@peterduncanson.net says...
Quote:
On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 10:14:32 +0100, Daniel James
wastebasket@nospam.aaisp.org> wrote:

In article news:<4fvvl0tf5ed78ahdo1t8emlrqv94nbl1ks@4ax.com>, Peter
Duncanson wrote:
Nycram wrote:
I think diplomats "sent to lie abroad" use the word

[A typo, I'm sure, but ...]

I see no typo.
[snip]
... lie as in sleep (i.e. dwell) ...

I'm certainly conscious of the multiple possible meanings of "lie",
but I thought, from the context, that in this case the poster had
intended to type "live" rather than "lie".

[ ... and I admit I cheated a little with the "old adage", by
adding the rider about politicians and the swipe at our own
president.]

Yes. I detected the personal rider.

Google fings a number of "lie abroad" quotes all of which either date the
saying to the 16th century or specifically attribute it to Sir Henry Wooton
Sr. English author and diplomat 1568-1639
http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/henry_wotton,_sr./
"An ambassador is an honest man sent abroad to lie for his country."

In a different quote Sir Henry also added a rider:
"An ambassador is a man of virtue sent to lie abroad for his country; a
news-writer is a man without virtue who lies at home for himself"



The poster (me) was perfectly well aware of the source of the quotation,

and of its double meaning.

Gary
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